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Words of the former protagonists, currently gods. ”Amazing.”

”Like nothing I have experienced before.”

"[...] an extensive and profound rite of passage [...]"

”After the third act I planned what to talk about the piece, but the fourth act destroyed my plan. Now I don’t know how to describe it.”

”The knowing that comes from Plato’s Symposium is a performer’s knowledge, a knowing from inside. Because it has no external referent, and no way toward abstraction, it eludes relativity.”

”Three or four communities were created during the piece.”

”The fourth act reminded me of weddings, funerals or bar mitzvah - rituals that most people go through during there lives, rituals that can happen again, but are never the same.”

”[…] it left a miserable taste in my mouth that has not gone away.”

”First disrupting the division between fabricated scenic (modeling) reality and act-ual, daily reality by using food, physical transformation (real action: piercing of a nipple), and embedding of the “play” in “real” time (the performance took protagonist-participants through 5 days), RRC emphasizes processes for interpreting reality and empowers individual selves to build private symbolic schemas.”

Curse
Curse

”It expanded the meaning of theatre. It expanded the meaning of ritual. It expanded the meaning of theory.”

”This was something I have been waiting for years: I have to choose a beautiful image and then they say: Make an argument about it!”

"A recurrent theme in our conversations of Plato’s Symposium has been the crisis of language, the breakdown of logos, in the face of such a complex and transformative experience. An inevitable futility seems to shade our every endeavor to illuminate those who were not involved about our experience. Perhaps there was something in this predicament that is revealing about the nature of Beauty, or more specifically, Platonic beauty."

"It got me menstruating."

”The argument of the work, one for Absolute Beauty, is levied through this process of being within one’s own and others’ ritual enactments, as performer and spectator. It does not exist outside of these exchanges, and therefore (though radically subjective) it is not relative […] the rituals can seem disturbing, dark, cruel, alienating. In this sense, and perhaps in contradiction to the claims of the performance as a whole, spectatorship in Plato’s Symposium—regardless of its reliance on the Absolute that emerges from the performed act—is still regulated by a subjectivity that can be seduced or repelled. It is, in the end, the performance as secret society that can deal with such subjectivities.”

”Beauty is the purple of the cabbage.”

The Great Pumpkin
The Great Pumpkin

Words of the former protagonists, currently gods.

”Amazing.”

”Like nothing I have experienced before.”

”After the third act I planned what to talk about the piece, but the fourth act destroyed my plan. Now I don’t know how to describe it.”

”The knowing that comes from Plato’s Symposium is a performer’s knowledge, a knowing from inside. Because it has no external referent, and no way toward abstraction, it eludes relativity.”

”Three or four communities were created during the piece.”

”The fourth act reminded me of weddings, funerals or bar mitzvah - rituals that most people go through during there lives, rituals that can happen again, but are never the same.”

”[…] it left a miserable taste in my mouth that has not gone away.”

”First disrupting the division between fabricated scenic (modeling) reality and act-ual, daily reality by using food, physical transformation (real action: piercing of a nipple), and embedding of the “play” in “real” time (the performance took protagonist-participants through 5 days), RRC emphasizes processes for interpreting reality and empowers individual selves to build private symbolic schemas.”

Curse
Curse

”It expanded the meaning of theatre. It expanded the meaning of ritual. It expanded the meaning of theory.”

”This was something I have been waiting for years: I have to choose a beautiful image and then they say: Make an argument about it!”

”It got me menstruating.”

”The argument of the work, one for Absolute Beauty, is levied through this process of being within one’s own and others’ ritual enactments, as performer and spectator. It does not exist outside of these exchanges, and therefore (though radically subjective) it is not relative […] the rituals can seem disturbing, dark, cruel, alienating. In this sense, and perhaps in contradiction to the claims of the performance as a whole, spectatorship in Plato’s Symposium—regardless of its reliance on the Absolute that emerges from the performed act—is still regulated by a subjectivity that can be seduced or repelled. It is, in the end, the performance as secret society that can deal with such subjectivities.”

”Beauty is the purple of the cabbage.”

The Great Pumpkin
The Great Pumpkin

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